Flood Lights and Motion Detection

Security is very important to me, so my family can feel save inside our home protected from the elements outside. This is why my front porch is configured with a security camera, which snaps pictures should anyone approach my front door.

The problem at this time is the camera is on the inside of the house looking outside and at night I have to turn the night vision off, because it reflects off the window glass. So, I leave the front porch lights on to counter this issue, which works well but only when I remember to leave the porch lights on. Last night, we forgot to turn on the front porch lights.

Just shortly after Dusk, around 7pm, the door bell rang. I checked the security camera feed but it was pitch black out and the porch lights were not on. “Damn it!”, I thought. I approached the door, thinking there would be an Election flyer hanging somewhere, but the only thing thing I observed that was different was a missing pumpkin of mine from the porch step. I was very disappointed, angry and frustrated all at the same time to see this, because I spent a lot of energy finding a workable solution to catch and/or help prevent this activity from happening again. The doorbell would ring at night with no one there a handful of times since we’ve lived in this new neighborhood and I was expecting to catch who was invading our privacy.

So, I want to believe, if the porch lights were on last night the door bell wouldn’t have rang. So, to help prevent this from happening I’m going to do 2 things:

Wireless LED Flood light

1. Install a motion detection flood light. I ordered a battery operated, weatherproof, LED flood light for my front porch last week and installed it within seconds last night. If only I installed it the day it arrived. The model I ordered is Mr. Beams MB330 from Amazon, my favorite store to shop. I bought mine when it was just $13, but as of now it’s around $19 with prime shipping, which is still a great deal. Reviews on this product are steller for good reason, because this light works really well. The light blasts on just before you approach my front door step and lights up the entire porch.

Benefits from this unit so far include:

  • Extremely bright LED with minimum power consumption, 140 Lumens
  • Motion sensor turns Spotlight on and off automatically
  • Features weatherproof design for durability
  • Simple wireless installation in minutes
  • Provides 350-Square Feet of coverage, battery operated

Motion detection porch light

2. Order motion detection porch lights. Since it’s not always so easy to remember to turn on the porch lights, I’m going to have technology do it for me. I grabbed a pair of decorative porch lights called Heath Zenith SL-4132-MW Bayside Mission Style 150-Degree Motion Sensing Decorative Security Light on Amazon for $29.95 each with prime shipping to test them out. If I like them then I’ll order a second pair for the outside Garage lights. Before I made this purchase, I did check out my local hardware store and there was nothing I could find in this decorative style. All I could find were unattractive flood lights. I turned to the internet and there were dozens of options! The fixtures should arrive early next week for me to install.

So, I’ll report back when both solutions are working properly and if I happen to catch what’s disturbing our peace.

 

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One Response to Flood Lights and Motion Detection

  1. door bell says:

    IR night vision The door bell phone support IR night vision. Again the IC 555 runs in the astable mode, creating flashing pulses at frequencies set by R1 and C1.
    The only drawback is that the Snack – Shotz only works with Discos Flying Dog Treats, which cost $4.

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